Posts tagged ‘Headboard’

This is what I get for not being an architect…

Or maybe it’s what I get for not taking measurements. Anyway…

When Chris and I bought our condo the dining room measurements were listed as 8’x8′ on MLS Trend. When we got our condo appraised, the floorplan drawn up in the paperwork also noted the dining room as 8’x8′. When I bought a 16′ piece of wood from Home Depot and had it cut in 2 for the dining room bench, I assumed both pieces were 8′. So when I bought four 8′ pieces of wood for the bench back this week, I assumed they would fit.

Well it turns out our dining room is actually 7’10” x 7’10”.

The wood is still 8′.

Uh oh.

So after 3 trips to Lowe’s in 2 hours Wednesday night, the bench back is secured and upholstered..and standing on its side behind the dining room bench.On the bright side, the bench is reupholstered in this beautiful, more appropriate, more luxurious fabric. The brown pleather was nice in theory, but it was purchased before we painted the room. The red washed out the brown and it just looked cheap. I stapled the new fabric right over the pleather plus another layer of batting, so it’s plusher than ever.The Instructional:

I laid down the fabric first, smoothing out all wrinkles. The batting went over that and the wood over that. I utilized Chris to make sure the wood went down in its place in 1 try, as to not snag or fluster the batting. I didn’t think of how I would secure the 4 long pieces until I got home with the wood and realized I would need to lay a thin 1 inch piece perpendicular. This photo shows the 2″ pieces that I purchased as the bench sides, but they were too thick. So began my 1st of 3 journeys to Lowe’s.I purchased three 1″ thick pieces of wood to secure the four 8′ pieces. To ensure a tight fit for the fabric, I stapled the batting and fabric around all 4 sides before screwing on the 3 smaller pieces.Since this couldn’t safely rest on top of the bench, I had to head back out to Lowe’s for a picture hanging kit (This was actually the 3rd trip as the 2nd trip I forgot my wallet…where is my head these days?). I partially hammered the rings in until they were tight enough to screw in (a screwdriver can’t be used with these). After tying the wire through 3 rings it was ready to hang.The kit also included U-brackets to hang the wire upon. Each of these can hold 75 lbs. I used 2, 1 for every 4 feet.Re-upholstering the bench was a breeze. I pulled the bench a foot away from the wall, turned it on its side and laid the batting on top of the pleather.I repeated this step with the fabric and turned the bench on its other side to staple the bottom.Since the back was way too heavy and Chris wasn’t home, it took me about an hour of maneuvering and pivoting until I realized the back was too long. My shoulder muscles ache today just from getting it over the bench to its upright position.Being the optimists that we are, we didn’t let this snafu hinder us from enjoying Chris’ birthday dinner in our dining room. Truffle fries, grilled sausage with carmelized onions, and filet mignon à la Daddy Mims. Delicious!Excuse the lighting..Ambiance isn’t captured well on film.

DIY: Headboard

 

 

What you will need:

 

  • Plywood
  • Fabric
  • Foam
  • Batting
  • Drill
  • Staple gun and staples
  • Tape measure
  •  

 

Your local hardware store has the plywood you need and will cut it to size for you. Both of the above headboards are cut to 5 feet wide for a queen size bed. They are also both 4 feet high (you’ll need to account for what hangs below the top of the mattress. These both start at the top of the boxspring, therefore appearing 3 feet high above the mattress). You can have it cut wider (or buy additional pieces) to extend past the mattress above both nightstands for a more prominent look. I bought an 8′ by 4′ piece of plywood from Home Depot for $16.

You can buy both the foam and batting, cut to size, at a fabric or craft store. I buy mine at Joann Fabric. With the never-ending coupons they offer, you can get the foam for around $2/yard (depending on how thick you want it..I used 1 inch). The batting is $3 a yard. The foam should be the exact size of the plywood (you’ll probably need 2 separate pieces because of the widths available). For a 5ft x 4ft headboard, I bought 10 feet of 2ft wide foam and cut it into 2 5ft halves. (You’ll see what I mean below). The batting will be wide enough so you’ll only need 1 piece. Make sure to buy 1 foot more than you need to enable it to wrap around and be stapled onto the back of the plywood. The fabric of your choice should be the same size as the batting.

If you want a tufted headboard, decide how many rows of tufts you’ll need, and how spaced apart they will be. You’ll need a pencil for this. I used 7 tufts in the top row of both my own headboard and my mom’s. For my mom’s I used 7 in the second also. For mine, I put 8 in the middle row and 7 in the bottom. There’s some math involved here but I’ll try to explain it as simply as possible.

For a 4 foot high headboard, the mattress is 1 ft thick. I measured 1 foot from the bottom and drew a line from side to side. This part will hang below the mattress. and therefore is not visually a part of the headboard. I divided the remaining 3 feet into even rows. My own headboard has 3 rows, starting 10 inches from the top, with 8 inches between rows. My mom’s has 2 rows, starting 10 inches from the top, with 1 foot between the 2 rows.

Measure down 10 inches (or whatever you decided) from the top and draw a line from side to side, making sure it’s even. Do the same for your second row (and third and fourth if you choose).

For a 5 foot headboard, I wanted a foot on each side with no tufts. That leaves 3 ft to be tufted 7 times. 36 inches divided by 7 tufts (6 spaces between the 7 tufts) leaves 6 inches between tufts. Phew! I promise this is the hardest part!

Measure along the line in the increments that you chose (In this case, start 1 foot from the end and every 6 inches from there, until you have 7 marks). Repeat for remaining rows. 

Drill a hole into each marking.

Once you have evenly spaced holes where your tufts will go, you’re ready for the fun part.

Lay the batting down on the ground, making sure it’s smooth. Place the foam on top of it, leaving excess batting on each side.

Carefully lay the plywood on top..it helps to have a second set of hands here but it’s not necessary.

Now..staple away!

Once the majority is stapled along all 4 sides, stand the board up and make sure it’s smooth. Don’t fret if it’s not, just pull taut and staple some more.

Next, drape the fabric over and continue stapling.

Hospital corners:

Voila!

The tufting is a little hard on the fingers, but it’s easy enough. If you’re using beads with a large enough hole, you can use twine. I was using pearls from the Potomac Bead Company, and I had to use sewing string because of the small hole. It is easier to hide from the front, but doesn’t create as dramatic of a tuft due to fear of breakage.

Thread the string through a thin needle and go from back to front through the holes you pre-drilled in the plywood. At the front, thread the bead on and then go back through the same hole.

At the back, staple the string close to the hole, staple it again an inch further and make a knot. Then staple it a third time closer to the hole to create a triangle. If you’re using large enough beads, you can put a staple in the front right under the hole to create a deep tuft, but only if the bead will hide the staple and your staple gun is strong enough to hold the foam to the plywood.

The result of all your hard work:

A beautiful couture headboard!
 
With all different fabric materials, colors, and beads, this simple formula can create a wide variety of headboards.
Feel free to ask questions if any clarification is needed.

Master Suite Makeover Part 2

I completed most of the groundwork for my mom’s bedroom this past weekend. Headboard, check. Rearrange furniture, check. Acquire seating at a bargain price, check. Paint, che…let’s not get ahead of ourselves. But the colors are picked out and purchased.

The border came down with no problem at all (not photographed yet). The right wall behind the bed will be the taupe color shown in the photos above and below. The rest of the room will be a darker shade of purple.

The colors look a little skewed here, but the headboard and new wall color on the left are almost identical shades of purple. To dress the bed up a little, I plan on replacing the current matching bed skirt with a purple tailored skirt. Some bigger, more prominent pillows in coordinating colors will also be added. In place of the purple afghan will be a darker, plusher throw blanket to add contrast. (The left nightstand is spaced unevenly from the bed because of a vent, but I’ve got a plan for that).

These photos were taken prematurely. The room is still very much “in progress,” but after only a few hours spent over 1 weekend, the heavy labor is done. Only one wall remains to be painted, artwork to be found, lamps be purchased, and new window treatments to be hung. “Final touches,” as I call them.

 

While I originally planned on 2 accent chairs near the window, this chaise jumped out at me at Home Goods. Originally priced at $300 (which is already 20%-60% lower than department and specialty stores), it was marked down to $200. The color will look beautiful in the bedroom and along with a storage chest at the foot of the bed, will provide a perfect seating area for my mom and her sisters.

I’m still thinking about this armoire. The only thing I know is that it is not staying there. With the addition of the chaise that will go under either window, the armoire will be returned to caddy corner or placed against the right wall. Ideally though, I would love for the chaise to go under the right window. If only I could find a new place for that cumbersome armoire.

Stay tuned for a Headboard How-to as well as the “After” photos of the Master Bedroom Makeover.

My Bedroom in all its imperfections

My last post about the canopy gone wrong made me realize that I haven’t photographed my bedroom in full yet. This wasn’t just a misstep on my part, but a deliberate attempt to not show what was not yet done. But I’ve gotten over that and am ready to reveal my “in process” rooms, no matter the state.

Here goes:

*Pay no attention to the “canopy” above the bed that I haven’t taken down yet.

The window valances came with the bed set and are not staying. I hung them up with white sheer panels that I “eyeballed” instead of taking measurements. They were about a foot short of touching the window sill.

I may have previously mentioned my newfound addiction to wallpapering furniture. That is on display in these photos.

The bench at the foot of the bed is made up of 2 2-drawer components from Target. I made the bench pad from foam, batting and the same velvet fabric used for the headboard. The trim from JoAnn fabrics is only fastened with pins right now because I didn’t buy enough and haven’t sewn it yet.

The drawer front is a different pattern than the sides.  Not sure if I love it yet. In the picture above it seems to go together, but up close it looks a little more clashed. Take a look:

I bought the rolls of wallpaper on Ebay for a total of $20 (1 roll of each).

What triggered the addiction was my bedroom vanity. One of our first furniture purchases was a TV stand from Ikea for $50. After falling in love with a coffee table that didn’t match this style at all and deciding to mount our tv to the wall, we had no use for this TV stand. I mean NO use. With a little over 850 sq ft to work with, we brainstormed every room. Maybe a buffet in our 8×8 dining room. Maybe a wall mounted shelf over our bedroom closet. Maybe a work area in the office. None of these rooms could spare the space. It stayed in our hall for a month while we thought of who we could give it to or if we should eat the $50 and throw it out.

Finally! when talking with a friend about my desire for a vanity in our bedroom as well as my wish for a versatile mini bar, she suggested I add taller legs to the trash-bound TV stand and paint it. We left for Ikea immediately and bought 4 legs at $12.50 each with casters for easy mobility.

It was decided the surface couldn’t be painted without sanding, and wallpapering would be the way to go.

The result is my beautiful bedroom vanity:

The ends are a little messy so I plan on adding a gold trim…just haven’t figured out how yet.

The stool is from Home Goods, $30. It’s a little short right now, nothing Ikea legs can’t fix. Still not sure if I will keep it. I wanted a vanity stool that could look good on its own if I ever move the vanity into the living room to serve as a buffet table during a party. But maybe that’s a silly idea to decorate around.

The mirror will be hung on the wall. We’re also still looking for alot of creative art work. Don’t judge our bare walls just yet.

Revisions to be made to the scene on the left:

  • Canopy removed
  • Pendant lighting hung above nightstands.
  • Wall art

 

 

 

 

Revisions to be made to the scene on the right:

  • Mirror hung on wall
  • Wall Art
  • TV wires hidden (in living room)

At the risk of looking tacky…

You’ve seen our bedroom. The headboard blends into the wall with a very similar color scheme. To add some contrast and make the headboard pop, I wanted to add gold canopy netting around the head of the bed.

Something like this, but in half.  Our ceiling fan is right over the foot of the bed, so a 4 poster canopy is out of the question.

Something like this, but instead of a ring at the top, the mesh would be fastened to the wall or ceiling..

This is gorgeous, and it even resembles our bedroom. (We’re not using posts because we don’t want to subtract visually from the room size, but the curtain behind the headboard here is exactly what I was going for.

 

Instead, I got this…

 

What resembles a 1987 Las Vegas honeymoon suite. Fastened with only tacks, I put it up hastily to see what it would look like. It is coming down immediately and I am hesitant about making a second attempt.

To be honest, I had second thoughts about even posting this photo. But I made this site as a portfolio of my good ideas, and sometimes you have to wade through the bad and the ugly to get to the good.

The first 3 photos are from www.philippineinteriordesign.com , www.beekeeperscottage.com , & www.seasonedwithlove.com respectively. Last photo is my own, regretfully.

Headboard, without such a bed is not complete

After sleeping on an air mattress for 3 weeks, we finally upgraded to a plush mattress/box spring set with, get this, a bed frame! But spoiled little me still wasn’t happy. I felt that in our first adult place, we needed an adult bed. That required a headboard. My male counterpart didn’t see the necessity nor did he want to spend hundreds on a headboard to match my theme of “tranquil dream bedroom.” I agreed, and therefore set out learning how to make a custom headboard.

After deciding on 5 feet wide by 4 feet high, I marched over to Home Depot to get a large piece of plywood cut ($12). Next to Joann’s I bought white velvet fabric ($10), upholstery batting ($6), and 2 inch thick foam ($20 for two 5-ft pieces).

For an easier tufted look, try this bench pad idea from BHG

To achieve the tufts, I measured and pre-drilled holes in the plywood before stapling anything onto it. Next I lay down the batting in the middle of my living

Bed set from Steinmart, 19 pieces for $129

room, carefully aligned the foam on top of the batting, and finally dropped the plywood down without disturbing the 2 layers. My staple gun took over from there, securing the batting, and therefore the foam, to the back of the plywood. Next I stood it up and fastened the velvet fabric in the same way, making sure it was smooth and free of snags and ruffles. That part was easy and looked great too. I had never tufted before and was set on it, but I would have been content with just an upholstered headboard.

The tufting was the hard part and I spread it out over 2 days. I bought a string of pearl beads and thin clear beading wire from Potomac Bead Company. With a sewing needle I strung the wire from the back (through the pre-drilled holes) to the front, through the bead, and back through the same hole again. The hardest part was going from the front through velvet, foam, and batting, to find the same hole that it had come through, without disturbing the set location for the bead. Once in the back, I secured the wire with 3-4 staples, looping the wire in a criss-cross pattern. 21 times later, my headboard was complete!

Love this drape idea from BHG

The velvet is bright white, but the green foam bleeds through a little to make the headboard match the light blue wall. To achieve some contrast, I’m thinking of either framing the headboard in gold, or adding a cornice and sheer gold drapes above the bed.

There are inexpensive ideas that don't involve stealing items from your neighbor's front yard.


Easy headboard (Sacrificing Design): Drape a towel over existing metal bars

Headboards don’t have to be expensive to be beautiful. Even a sanded and oiled piece of plywood can make all the difference in your bedroom.

All headboards pictured here are from Better Homes and Gardens (except for the 2 of my own bed).

See more ideas, good and bad, at http://www.bhg.com/decorating/do-it-yourself/headboards/cheap-chic-headboard-projects/

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