Posts tagged ‘JoAnn Fabrics’

This is what I get for not being an architect…

Or maybe it’s what I get for not taking measurements. Anyway…

When Chris and I bought our condo the dining room measurements were listed as 8’x8′ on MLS Trend. When we got our condo appraised, the floorplan drawn up in the paperwork also noted the dining room as 8’x8′. When I bought a 16′ piece of wood from Home Depot and had it cut in 2 for the dining room bench, I assumed both pieces were 8′. So when I bought four 8′ pieces of wood for the bench back this week, I assumed they would fit.

Well it turns out our dining room is actually 7’10” x 7’10”.

The wood is still 8′.

Uh oh.

So after 3 trips to Lowe’s in 2 hours Wednesday night, the bench back is secured and upholstered..and standing on its side behind the dining room bench.On the bright side, the bench is reupholstered in this beautiful, more appropriate, more luxurious fabric. The brown pleather was nice in theory, but it was purchased before we painted the room. The red washed out the brown and it just looked cheap. I stapled the new fabric right over the pleather plus another layer of batting, so it’s plusher than ever.The Instructional:

I laid down the fabric first, smoothing out all wrinkles. The batting went over that and the wood over that. I utilized Chris to make sure the wood went down in its place in 1 try, as to not snag or fluster the batting. I didn’t think of how I would secure the 4 long pieces until I got home with the wood and realized I would need to lay a thin 1 inch piece perpendicular. This photo shows the 2″ pieces that I purchased as the bench sides, but they were too thick. So began my 1st of 3 journeys to Lowe’s.I purchased three 1″ thick pieces of wood to secure the four 8′ pieces. To ensure a tight fit for the fabric, I stapled the batting and fabric around all 4 sides before screwing on the 3 smaller pieces.Since this couldn’t safely rest on top of the bench, I had to head back out to Lowe’s for a picture hanging kit (This was actually the 3rd trip as the 2nd trip I forgot my wallet…where is my head these days?). I partially hammered the rings in until they were tight enough to screw in (a screwdriver can’t be used with these). After tying the wire through 3 rings it was ready to hang.The kit also included U-brackets to hang the wire upon. Each of these can hold 75 lbs. I used 2, 1 for every 4 feet.Re-upholstering the bench was a breeze. I pulled the bench a foot away from the wall, turned it on its side and laid the batting on top of the pleather.I repeated this step with the fabric and turned the bench on its other side to staple the bottom.Since the back was way too heavy and Chris wasn’t home, it took me about an hour of maneuvering and pivoting until I realized the back was too long. My shoulder muscles ache today just from getting it over the bench to its upright position.Being the optimists that we are, we didn’t let this snafu hinder us from enjoying Chris’ birthday dinner in our dining room. Truffle fries, grilled sausage with carmelized onions, and filet mignon à la Daddy Mims. Delicious!Excuse the lighting..Ambiance isn’t captured well on film.

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Quick barstool update

These barstools were given to us by our dear friends G & L. They were too tall for our counters and a little plain for our decor, but fancy barstools can cost anywhere from $40 to $120 a piece. So  I used what I know. L’s dad was kind enough to chop off 5 inches (the man has every tool imaginable), making them the perfect height for our breakfast buffet (I like ample room to cross my legs). Main problem solved. Secondly, I wanted to add a seat cushion to dress them up a tad.

This is a fairly simple project:

First I laid the stools on top of batting and cut around. Make sure to leave enough room to staple.

Staple around perimeter before laying on top of fabric.Repeat stapling on fabric.

The fabric adds just the little bit of pizzazz I was looking for without detracting from the more focal furniture pieces in the room. I used the same blue micro suede on a floor pillow that rests a mere feet away (not pictured here). It ties the pieces together to avoid the random look that few people are fond of.

I love this cherry wood barstool found at CSN Stores for $78. We still have the red oak stain that we used on our coffee table, therefore the stools may get a little more dramatic in the near future.

If you have a bar in your home, you can save money on barstools by purchasing them used on craigslist or at a thrift store. With a little help from a staple gun and a trip to JoAnn’s, they’ll be brand new for much less.

Vanity Showcase

I’ve showed my vanity briefly before, but this post will be dedicated solely to that. My neighbor Amy of Amy Bird Tweets recently suggested I send pictures of my DIY to Jackie at Sweetie Pie Pumpkin Noodle for her “Vanity Week.” I hesitated because of the beautiful vanities she already had pictured on her site. So I was inspired to turn the empty wallpapered table in my bedroom with a mirror perched on it into a beautiful vanity where I glamourize myself.

I hung up the mirror, gathered all my beauty products that were scattered in front of the closet mirrors, in the bathroom, and even in the office, and finished the trim that I’ve been thinking about for weeks.

The result: Something practical, and beautiful. Since we have yet to find any great artwork for the bedroom, my jewelry on display will do for now.

But wait! With only a quick flick of the wrist…

 

It becomes a bar in my living room! I will show a better example of the bar/buffet during our housewarming party in a few weeks. It only took 5 months, but this blog has helped me get the to-do list down from 100 items to about 40…so we finally planned our housewarming and now I have 3 weeks to finish the remaining items.

I really love the finished look Joann’s hem tape gave. Thanks to Amy and Jackie for pushing me to finish this!

DIY: Headboard

 

 

What you will need:

 

  • Plywood
  • Fabric
  • Foam
  • Batting
  • Drill
  • Staple gun and staples
  • Tape measure
  •  

 

Your local hardware store has the plywood you need and will cut it to size for you. Both of the above headboards are cut to 5 feet wide for a queen size bed. They are also both 4 feet high (you’ll need to account for what hangs below the top of the mattress. These both start at the top of the boxspring, therefore appearing 3 feet high above the mattress). You can have it cut wider (or buy additional pieces) to extend past the mattress above both nightstands for a more prominent look. I bought an 8′ by 4′ piece of plywood from Home Depot for $16.

You can buy both the foam and batting, cut to size, at a fabric or craft store. I buy mine at Joann Fabric. With the never-ending coupons they offer, you can get the foam for around $2/yard (depending on how thick you want it..I used 1 inch). The batting is $3 a yard. The foam should be the exact size of the plywood (you’ll probably need 2 separate pieces because of the widths available). For a 5ft x 4ft headboard, I bought 10 feet of 2ft wide foam and cut it into 2 5ft halves. (You’ll see what I mean below). The batting will be wide enough so you’ll only need 1 piece. Make sure to buy 1 foot more than you need to enable it to wrap around and be stapled onto the back of the plywood. The fabric of your choice should be the same size as the batting.

If you want a tufted headboard, decide how many rows of tufts you’ll need, and how spaced apart they will be. You’ll need a pencil for this. I used 7 tufts in the top row of both my own headboard and my mom’s. For my mom’s I used 7 in the second also. For mine, I put 8 in the middle row and 7 in the bottom. There’s some math involved here but I’ll try to explain it as simply as possible.

For a 4 foot high headboard, the mattress is 1 ft thick. I measured 1 foot from the bottom and drew a line from side to side. This part will hang below the mattress. and therefore is not visually a part of the headboard. I divided the remaining 3 feet into even rows. My own headboard has 3 rows, starting 10 inches from the top, with 8 inches between rows. My mom’s has 2 rows, starting 10 inches from the top, with 1 foot between the 2 rows.

Measure down 10 inches (or whatever you decided) from the top and draw a line from side to side, making sure it’s even. Do the same for your second row (and third and fourth if you choose).

For a 5 foot headboard, I wanted a foot on each side with no tufts. That leaves 3 ft to be tufted 7 times. 36 inches divided by 7 tufts (6 spaces between the 7 tufts) leaves 6 inches between tufts. Phew! I promise this is the hardest part!

Measure along the line in the increments that you chose (In this case, start 1 foot from the end and every 6 inches from there, until you have 7 marks). Repeat for remaining rows. 

Drill a hole into each marking.

Once you have evenly spaced holes where your tufts will go, you’re ready for the fun part.

Lay the batting down on the ground, making sure it’s smooth. Place the foam on top of it, leaving excess batting on each side.

Carefully lay the plywood on top..it helps to have a second set of hands here but it’s not necessary.

Now..staple away!

Once the majority is stapled along all 4 sides, stand the board up and make sure it’s smooth. Don’t fret if it’s not, just pull taut and staple some more.

Next, drape the fabric over and continue stapling.

Hospital corners:

Voila!

The tufting is a little hard on the fingers, but it’s easy enough. If you’re using beads with a large enough hole, you can use twine. I was using pearls from the Potomac Bead Company, and I had to use sewing string because of the small hole. It is easier to hide from the front, but doesn’t create as dramatic of a tuft due to fear of breakage.

Thread the string through a thin needle and go from back to front through the holes you pre-drilled in the plywood. At the front, thread the bead on and then go back through the same hole.

At the back, staple the string close to the hole, staple it again an inch further and make a knot. Then staple it a third time closer to the hole to create a triangle. If you’re using large enough beads, you can put a staple in the front right under the hole to create a deep tuft, but only if the bead will hide the staple and your staple gun is strong enough to hold the foam to the plywood.

The result of all your hard work:

A beautiful couture headboard!
 
With all different fabric materials, colors, and beads, this simple formula can create a wide variety of headboards.
Feel free to ask questions if any clarification is needed.

My Bedroom in all its imperfections

My last post about the canopy gone wrong made me realize that I haven’t photographed my bedroom in full yet. This wasn’t just a misstep on my part, but a deliberate attempt to not show what was not yet done. But I’ve gotten over that and am ready to reveal my “in process” rooms, no matter the state.

Here goes:

*Pay no attention to the “canopy” above the bed that I haven’t taken down yet.

The window valances came with the bed set and are not staying. I hung them up with white sheer panels that I “eyeballed” instead of taking measurements. They were about a foot short of touching the window sill.

I may have previously mentioned my newfound addiction to wallpapering furniture. That is on display in these photos.

The bench at the foot of the bed is made up of 2 2-drawer components from Target. I made the bench pad from foam, batting and the same velvet fabric used for the headboard. The trim from JoAnn fabrics is only fastened with pins right now because I didn’t buy enough and haven’t sewn it yet.

The drawer front is a different pattern than the sides.  Not sure if I love it yet. In the picture above it seems to go together, but up close it looks a little more clashed. Take a look:

I bought the rolls of wallpaper on Ebay for a total of $20 (1 roll of each).

What triggered the addiction was my bedroom vanity. One of our first furniture purchases was a TV stand from Ikea for $50. After falling in love with a coffee table that didn’t match this style at all and deciding to mount our tv to the wall, we had no use for this TV stand. I mean NO use. With a little over 850 sq ft to work with, we brainstormed every room. Maybe a buffet in our 8×8 dining room. Maybe a wall mounted shelf over our bedroom closet. Maybe a work area in the office. None of these rooms could spare the space. It stayed in our hall for a month while we thought of who we could give it to or if we should eat the $50 and throw it out.

Finally! when talking with a friend about my desire for a vanity in our bedroom as well as my wish for a versatile mini bar, she suggested I add taller legs to the trash-bound TV stand and paint it. We left for Ikea immediately and bought 4 legs at $12.50 each with casters for easy mobility.

It was decided the surface couldn’t be painted without sanding, and wallpapering would be the way to go.

The result is my beautiful bedroom vanity:

The ends are a little messy so I plan on adding a gold trim…just haven’t figured out how yet.

The stool is from Home Goods, $30. It’s a little short right now, nothing Ikea legs can’t fix. Still not sure if I will keep it. I wanted a vanity stool that could look good on its own if I ever move the vanity into the living room to serve as a buffet table during a party. But maybe that’s a silly idea to decorate around.

The mirror will be hung on the wall. We’re also still looking for alot of creative art work. Don’t judge our bare walls just yet.

Revisions to be made to the scene on the left:

  • Canopy removed
  • Pendant lighting hung above nightstands.
  • Wall art

 

 

 

 

Revisions to be made to the scene on the right:

  • Mirror hung on wall
  • Wall Art
  • TV wires hidden (in living room)

Just a little rant

I want to take a moment to express the shock I am suffering from the prices of window treatments and decorative accents. I’ve never dressed a window before. Our last place together was a tiny little studio and was very temporary so drapes were not needed. My place before that was college housing…No explanation needed.

So I’ve tossed around the idea of buying fabric and creating my custom window treatments, but after all the “couture” I’ve added to the condo thus far, I thought it would be nice to run out real quick, pick up some curtains, and voila! our living room is dressed. Imagine my surprise when, whilst perusing JCPenney’s home section, I come across this beautiful display that would work in both my bedroom and living room, for upwards of $265, ON SALE.

So fine, this is a Cindy Crawford design and “versatile” per their website: JCPenney “Create your own look”, but I have 3 rooms that need dressing, 2 of much importance (I’m not as invested in the office just yet). But of course, I didn’t just give up. I figured, I’ll find some panels in these colors, and create my own version of the look. Afterall, most of these panels don’t even have pockets for the drapery rod. It is literally a hemmed piece of fabric. A long, beautiful, shiny, hemmed piece of fabric, but fabric nonetheless. In my search, the least expensive I have come across thus far is $10 per panel. Not even Home Goods could help a girl out! This look calls for 5 blue panels, 3 tan panels, and at least 2 sheer panels. That’s still $100. I get that window treatments are important and can make or break a room. But it’s fabric! Why is it this expensive??

I have been experiencing the same problem with throw pillows. I have a large tan couch that needs some pops of color. I plan on at least 4 accent pillows, preferably closer to 6, in addition to a throw blanket. At $20 a pop, this is getting outrageous! Why are small, slightly altered pieces of fabric so inflated in price?!

This is about 3 sq. feet of fabric. 1 yard. for $19.99 at Target. If I bought 1 yard of fabric at Joann’s, put 10 minutes of labor into making this pillow, I would have to charge $20 to turn a profit. But this fabric is being manufactured in bulk and I highly doubt it is being sewn by hand and taking anywhere close to 10 minutes per pillow. Highway robbery!

The Room in which we live

DISCLAIMER: I wanted to wait until I got my new digital camera to post pictures of our most lived in room, the living room, but my impatience would not allow it. The photos here were taken with my cell phone (no flash). I plan on replacing all photos once my camera arrives. Please don’t judge by the seemingly dark room.
 

The before

 

The Present!

This room is still in progress, as is the rest of our condo, but it’s come far since we first moved in to bare walls with no light whatsoever. (I’m very self conscious by the darkness of this photo, but it’s only the cell phone, I swear. We live in an abundance of light).

We waited for this couch for 6 weeks. Our living room is so oddly situated that I had some trouble arranging the furniture. Once I convinced my other half to make use of the “hall” by putting the tv against the far wall, it was decided that the couch must go against the window. I originally wanted a chaise sectional, wall to wall, U-shaped. But in our price range, it was impossible to find. The non-negotiable was that it had to be comfortable. I wanted to be able to lie down together and watch a movie without feeling squished or falling off the couch. This couch accomplishes just that. I take many a catnap here without suffering back problems. It is my favorite place in the condo and for only $600 (JCPenney Memorial Day sale), it really makes the room. The pillows are still TBD. I made the sofa pillows without pillowforms and learned the hard way how lumpy cotton stuffing can get. The large blue pillow on the right was intended to be a floor pillow, but I failed to accommodate for how much the thickness would subtract from the size.

The chairs are from Pier 1, also on sale for $130 each. They’re more about practicality and style than comfort.

The ladder “end tables” I ordered from Amazon for $60 each, and they are worth every penny. We didn’t need true end tables with such a large coffee table, and these add height and dimension to the room without wasting space.

The coffee table is from The Dump (Langhorne, Turnersville, and Oaks) and we stained it from a very light color that was almost identical to the couch, to a deep cherry oak.

The rug I made using 4 layers: Non-slip rubber rug pad, canvas, 2 inch thick batting, and soft, fuzzy fabric, all from Joann Fabric. It was one of the hardest things to date and my blood, sweat, and tears are in it. The seam really shows through the thick layers and it gives it a one-of-a-kind look (which it is).

Still on the to-do list: Drapes, Entertainment shelf under TV (not pictured, on wall opposite couch), Art over chairs

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